Patroni REST API

Patroni has a rich REST API, which is used by Patroni itself during the leader race, by the patronictl tool in order to perform failovers/switchovers/reinitialize/restarts/reloads, by HAProxy or any other kind of load balancer to perform HTTP health checks, and of course could also be used for monitoring. Below you will find the list of Patroni REST API endpoints.

Health check endpoints

For all health check GET requests Patroni returns a JSON document with the status of the node, along with the HTTP status code. If you don’t want or don’t need the JSON document, you might consider using the OPTIONS method instead of GET.

  • The following requests to Patroni REST API will return HTTP status code 200 only when the Patroni node is running as the leader:
    • GET /
    • GET /master
    • GET /leader
    • GET /primary
    • GET /read-write
  • GET /replica: replica health check endpoint. It returns HTTP status code 200 only when the Patroni node is in the state running, the role is replica and noloadbalance tag is not set.
  • GET /replica?lag=<max-lag>: replica check endpoint. In addition to checks from replica, it also checks replication latency and returns status code 200 only when it is below specified value. The key cluster.last_leader_operation from DCS is used for Leader wal position and compute latency on replica for performance reasons. max-lag can be specified in bytes (integer) or in human readable values, for e.g. 16kB, 64MB, 1GB.
    • GET /replica?lag=1048576
    • GET /replica?lag=1024kB
    • GET /replica?lag=10MB
    • GET /replica?lag=1GB
  • GET /read-only: like the above endpoint, but also includes the primary.
  • GET /standby-leader: returns HTTP status code 200 only when the Patroni node is running as the leader in a standby cluster.
  • GET /synchronous or GET /sync: returns HTTP status code 200 only when the Patroni node is running as a synchronous standby.
  • GET /asynchronous or GET /async: returns HTTP status code 200 only when the Patroni node is running as an asynchronous standby.
  • GET /asynchronous?lag=<max-lag> or GET /async?lag=<max-lag>: asynchronous standby check endpoint. In addition to checks from asynchronous or async, it also checks replication latency and returns status code 200 only when it is below specified value. The key cluster.last_leader_operation from DCS is used for Leader wal position and compute latency on replica for performance reasons. max-lag can be specified in bytes (integer) or in human readable values, for e.g. 16kB, 64MB, 1GB.
    • GET /async?lag=1048576
    • GET /async?lag=1024kB
    • GET /async?lag=10MB
    • GET /async?lag=1GB
  • GET /health: returns HTTP status code 200 only when PostgreSQL is up and running.
  • GET /liveness: always returns HTTP status code 200 what only indicates that Patroni is running. Could be used for livenessProbe.
  • GET /readiness: returns HTTP status code 200 when the Patroni node is running as the leader or when PostgreSQL is up and running. The endpoint could be used for readinessProbe when it is not possible to use Kubenetes endpoints for leader elections (OpenShift).

Both, readiness and liveness endpoints are very light-weight and not executing any SQL. Probes should be configured in such a way that they start failing about time when the leader key is expiring. With the default value of ttl, which is 30s example probes would look like:

readinessProbe:
  httpGet:
    scheme: HTTP
    path: /readiness
    port: 8008
  initialDelaySeconds: 3
  periodSeconds: 10
  timeoutSeconds: 5
  successThreshold: 1
  failureThreshold: 3
livenessProbe:
  httpGet:
    scheme: HTTP
    path: /liveness
    port: 8008
  initialDelaySeconds: 3
  periodSeconds: 10
  timeoutSeconds: 5
  successThreshold: 1
  failureThreshold: 3

Monitoring endpoint

The GET /patroni is used by Patroni during the leader race. It also could be used by your monitoring system. The JSON document produced by this endpoint has the same structure as the JSON produced by the health check endpoints.

$ curl -s http://localhost:8008/patroni | jq .
{
  "state": "running",
  "postmaster_start_time": "2019-09-24 09:22:32.555 CEST",
  "role": "master",
  "server_version": 110005,
  "cluster_unlocked": false,
  "xlog": {
    "location": 25624640
  },
  "timeline": 3,
  "database_system_identifier": "6739877027151648096",
  "patroni": {
    "version": "1.6.0",
    "scope": "batman"
  }
}

Cluster status endpoints

  • The GET /cluster endpoint generates a JSON document describing the current cluster topology and state:
$ curl -s http://localhost:8008/cluster | jq .
{
  "members": [
    {
      "name": "postgresql0",
      "host": "127.0.0.1",
      "port": 5432,
      "role": "leader",
      "state": "running",
      "api_url": "http://127.0.0.1:8008/patroni",
      "timeline": 5,
      "tags": {
        "clonefrom": true
      }
    },
    {
      "name": "postgresql1",
      "host": "127.0.0.1",
      "port": 5433,
      "role": "replica",
      "state": "running",
      "api_url": "http://127.0.0.1:8009/patroni",
      "timeline": 5,
      "tags": {
        "clonefrom": true
      },
      "lag": 0
    }
  ],
  "scheduled_switchover": {
    "at": "2019-09-24T10:36:00+02:00",
    "from": "postgresql0"
  }
}
  • The GET /history endpoint provides a view on the history of cluster switchovers/failovers. The format is very similar to the content of history files in the pg_wal directory. The only difference is the timestamp field showing when the new timeline was created.
$ curl -s http://localhost:8008/history | jq .
[
  [
    1,
    25623960,
    "no recovery target specified",
    "2019-09-23T16:57:57+02:00"
  ],
  [
    2,
    25624344,
    "no recovery target specified",
    "2019-09-24T09:22:33+02:00"
  ],
  [
    3,
    25624752,
    "no recovery target specified",
    "2019-09-24T09:26:15+02:00"
  ],
  [
    4,
    50331856,
    "no recovery target specified",
    "2019-09-24T09:35:52+02:00"
  ]
]

Config endpoint

GET /config: Get the current version of the dynamic configuration:

$ curl -s localhost:8008/config | jq .
{
  "ttl": 30,
  "loop_wait": 10,
  "retry_timeout": 10,
  "maximum_lag_on_failover": 1048576,
  "postgresql": {
    "use_slots": true,
    "use_pg_rewind": true,
    "parameters": {
      "hot_standby": "on",
      "wal_log_hints": "on",
      "wal_level": "hot_standby",
      "max_wal_senders": 5,
      "max_replication_slots": 5,
      "max_connections": "100"
    }
  }
}

PATCH /config: Change the existing configuration.

$ curl -s -XPATCH -d \
        '{"loop_wait":5,"ttl":20,"postgresql":{"parameters":{"max_connections":"101"}}}' \
        http://localhost:8008/config | jq .
{
  "ttl": 20,
  "loop_wait": 5,
  "maximum_lag_on_failover": 1048576,
  "retry_timeout": 10,
  "postgresql": {
    "use_slots": true,
    "use_pg_rewind": true,
    "parameters": {
      "hot_standby": "on",
      "wal_log_hints": "on",
      "wal_level": "hot_standby",
      "max_wal_senders": 5,
      "max_replication_slots": 5,
      "max_connections": "101"
    }
  }
}

The above REST API call patches the existing configuration and returns the new configuration.

Let’s check that the node processed this configuration. First of all it should start printing log lines every 5 seconds (loop_wait=5). The change of “max_connections” requires a restart, so the “pending_restart” flag should be exposed:

$ curl -s http://localhost:8008/patroni | jq .
{
  "pending_restart": true,
  "database_system_identifier": "6287881213849985952",
  "postmaster_start_time": "2016-06-13 13:13:05.211 CEST",
  "xlog": {
    "location": 2197818976
  },
  "patroni": {
    "scope": "batman",
    "version": "1.0"
  },
  "state": "running",
  "role": "master",
  "server_version": 90503
}

Removing parameters:

If you want to remove (reset) some setting just patch it with null:

$ curl -s -XPATCH -d \
        '{"postgresql":{"parameters":{"max_connections":null}}}' \
        http://localhost:8008/config | jq .
{
  "ttl": 20,
  "loop_wait": 5,
  "retry_timeout": 10,
  "maximum_lag_on_failover": 1048576,
  "postgresql": {
    "use_slots": true,
    "use_pg_rewind": true,
    "parameters": {
      "hot_standby": "on",
      "unix_socket_directories": ".",
      "wal_level": "hot_standby",
      "wal_log_hints": "on",
      "max_wal_senders": 5,
      "max_replication_slots": 5
    }
  }
}

The above call removes postgresql.parameters.max_connections from the dynamic configuration.

PUT /config: It’s also possible to perform the full rewrite of an existing dynamic configuration unconditionally:

$ curl -s -XPUT -d \
        '{"maximum_lag_on_failover":1048576,"retry_timeout":10,"postgresql":{"use_slots":true,"use_pg_rewind":true,"parameters":{"hot_standby":"on","wal_log_hints":"on","wal_level":"hot_standby","unix_socket_directories":".","max_wal_senders":5}},"loop_wait":3,"ttl":20}' \
        http://localhost:8008/config | jq .
{
  "ttl": 20,
  "maximum_lag_on_failover": 1048576,
  "retry_timeout": 10,
  "postgresql": {
    "use_slots": true,
    "parameters": {
      "hot_standby": "on",
      "unix_socket_directories": ".",
      "wal_level": "hot_standby",
      "wal_log_hints": "on",
      "max_wal_senders": 5
    },
    "use_pg_rewind": true
  },
  "loop_wait": 3
}

Switchover and failover endpoints

POST /switchover or POST /failover. These endpoints are very similar to each other. There are a couple of minor differences though:

  1. The failover endpoint allows to perform a manual failover when there are no healthy nodes, but at the same time it will not allow you to schedule a switchover.
  2. The switchover endpoint is the opposite. It works only when the cluster is healthy (there is a leader) and allows to schedule a switchover at a given time.

In the JSON body of the POST request you must specify at least the leader or candidate fields and optionally the scheduled_at field if you want to schedule a switchover at a specific time.

Example: perform a failover to the specific node:

$ curl -s http://localhost:8009/failover -XPOST -d '{"candidate":"postgresql1"}'
Successfully failed over to "postgresql1"

Example: schedule a switchover from the leader to any other healthy replica in the cluster at a specific time:

$ curl -s http://localhost:8008/switchover -XPOST -d \
        '{"leader":"postgresql0","scheduled_at":"2019-09-24T12:00+00"}'
Switchover scheduled

Depending on the situation the request might finish with a different HTTP status code and body. The status code 200 is returned when the switchover or failover successfully completed. If the switchover was successfully scheduled, Patroni will return HTTP status code 202. In case something went wrong, the error status code (one of 400, 412 or 503) will be returned with some details in the response body. For more information please check the source code of patroni/api.py:do_POST_failover() method.

  • DELETE /switchover: delete the scheduled switchover

The POST /switchover and POST failover endpoints are used by patronictl switchover and patronictl failover, respectively. The DELETE /switchover is used by patronictl flush <cluster-name> switchover.

Restart endpoint

  • POST /restart: You can restart Postgres on the specific node by performing the POST /restart call. In the JSON body of POST request it is possible to optionally specify some restart conditions:
    • restart_pending: boolean, if set to true Patroni will restart PostgreSQL only when restart is pending in order to apply some changes in the PostgreSQL config.
    • role: perform restart only if the current role of the node matches with the role from the POST request.
    • postgres_version: perform restart only if the current version of postgres is smaller than specified in the POST request.
    • timeout: how long we should wait before PostgreSQL starts accepting connections. Overrides master_start_timeout.
    • schedule: timestamp with time zone, schedule the restart somewhere in the future.
  • DELETE /restart: delete the scheduled restart

POST /restart and DELETE /restart endpoints are used by patronictl restart and patronictl flush <cluster-name> restart respectively.

Reload endpoint

The POST /reload call will order Patroni to re-read and apply the configuration file. This is the equivalent of sending the SIGHUP signal to the Patroni process. In case you changed some of the Postgres parameters which require a restart (like shared_buffers), you still have to explicitly do the restart of Postgres by either calling the POST /restart endpoint or with the help of patronictl restart.

The reload endpoint is used by patronictl reload.

Reinitialize endpoint

POST /reinitialize: reinitialize the PostgreSQL data directory on the specified node. It is allowed to be executed only on replicas. Once called, it will remove the data directory and start pg_basebackup or some alternative replica creation method.

The call might fail if Patroni is in a loop trying to recover (restart) a failed Postgres. In order to overcome this problem one can specify {"force":true} in the request body.

The reinitialize endpoint is used by patronictl reinit.